Scraping Doggerel

I’ve noticed something strange these past few days. I’ll post a bit of something here and flip back to the WordPress admin panel prior to switching back over to the work computer to do, well, work. I like the admin panel on the personal PC so I can check posts by those I follow and use the notably better interface (compared to that on the mobile version) to comment and respond to comments.

And frankly, I like to see which posts receive better responses than others so I look at the more detailed stats page before switching over. It helps me gauge which posts are more interesting to people than others.

And the strangeness is on that output. I’m getting almost three views on a given post before I can navigate to that page. Not all posts, but enough to make me raise an eyebrow. Once or twice, and I’d consider such things as coincidental in nature. When it happens consistently, I suspect shenanigans of some sort.

I have a hard time believing anyone would sit on pins and needles for my next post, hitting F5/refresh on their browser until something new popped up on my site. As a result, I suspect what I’m really witnessing is blog scraping.

Now, for those of you who don’t know me, it might seem like something someone might get angry about. After all, scraping usually means that someone else is posting elsewhere and profiting off it.

Me, I don’t care much about the financial side of the matter. If someone is cashing in on my work (HAHAHAHA), I’d like a cut, but money has never been a big motivator to write.

I’m more concerned about attribution. “I wrote this drivel and doggerel! I demand to be credited with authoring this slop!”

As a result, I’ll probably append most posts with the following to combat re-authoring of what I write. I dislike doing so, and once expressed opinions against such things, but it seems the only way to keep folks honest. It’s silly really, but such is life.


©2020 Michael Raven. Originally posted on sceadugenga.com.

9 thoughts on “Scraping Doggerel”

    1. copyscape.com can be used to check to see if your content is elsewhere. It may be limited use, however, as I discovered when I checked my own and got quoted lyrics as posted elsewhere. Otherwise it might be reliant upon stumbling on it yourself.

      Like

        1. I just took a few steps that will discourage the practice, but the only solution is to not post at all. I’ve gotten used to it since the early 00s, but always hope that it loses popularity and thieves move onto something else.

          But it is a large part of why I largely post stories in draft form, rather than polished. If it’s really good stuff, in my opinion, or shows future promise, I keep it to myself.

          Liked by 1 person

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